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Health & Medical

Addressing Summertime Skin Issues

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It’s always important to take good care of your skin. Wearing sunscreen when venturing outdoors and applying lotion to keep moisture locked in are essential. But even if you follow these recommendations, there are other issues that can affect your skin during the summer.

Allergies are rampant during warmer months; patients may discover spots on their skin that become red, sore, or itchy, and may even bleed. Many people suffer skin reactions when they come in close contact with substances to which they’re allergic. “Patients with summer allergies may be candidates for the T.R.U.E. Test Allergen Patch,” said Dr. George Georgiev, Dermatologist with Morrison Community Hospital. “The test is conducted using a skin patch affixed to the body for at least 48 hours. We can determine whether the patient is allergic to any of the substances in the panels in the patch.”

Another important summertime issue is skin cancer. Early detection can lead to successful treatment, so annual skin checks are recommended. “Actinic Keratosis (AK) is a condition typically caused by sun damage,” added Dr. Georgiev. “It usually appears as a crusty, scaly bump, either red, pink, tan, or flesh-colored. The lesions may be flat or raised, rough in texture, and can be anywhere from one millimeter to two centimeters in size.” Lesions that feel rough, itch periodically, or become tender may lead to an AK diagnosis.

A chemical peel is one method that helps regenerate healthy new cells on the face, an area where skin cancers frequently develop. “Chemical peels exfoliate the surface layer of skin, allowing new cells to grow,” explained Dr. Georgiev. “An appropriate chemical solution is personalized for each patient. Most people benefit from lighter peels based on alpha or beta hydroxy, or salicylic acid. The skin becomes clearer, brighter, and more smooth.”

For a consultation to determine if the Allergen Test Patch or a chemical peel is right for you, please contact:

Dr. George Georgiev, MD

Morrison Community Hospital

303 North Jackson Street

Morrison, IL 61270

815-772-5511

www.morrisonhospital.com