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Dave Says - Dave Ramsey

You won’t get rich on other’s people’s vacations

Dear Dave,

What is your opinion of buying a vacation home, then renting it out when you’re not there?

– J.P.

Dear J.P.,

I see nothing wrong with it, as long as you’re buying with cash and you’re debt-free. A vacation home is a wonderful “extra” as you start building wealth. Remember though, it’s still basically a very large, very expensive toy. In most cases it will go up in value, and if you rent it, it might become something of a money-maker for you.

But here’s another side to vacation home rentals: You’ll probably make some money, but in most cases there will be several weeks during a year when it sits empty. You’re not going to get rich renting it out. So, they’re not really great investment properties. What you’re talking about is more of a plan to offset the annual costs of your toy. If you look at it that way, I don’t think you’ll be disappointed.

If you’re determined to go this route, be ready to deal with spills on the carpet and damage from your guests, along with general maintenance and repairs. There’s always something that needs attention when you own a property. But if you can handle all that emotionally and financially – and you’re not looking for it to be a big-time investment that will make you rich – you’ll be fine.

– Dave

Learn the ins and outs of in vitro

Dear Dave,

My wife and I are on Baby Step 2 of your plan. We have about $60,000 in debt left to pay off before we’ll be debt-free, and a household income of $140,000 a year. We have one child, but we would like to expand our family. We would have to do this using in vitro fertilization. We’ve talked to a doctor, and he’s given us a ballpark figure of about $20,000 for the procedure. Should we wait until we’re debt-free to have this done?

– Jim

Dear Jim,

Babies are wonderful, important things. Having kids, even the thought of having kids, is a big emotional deal. But sometimes it can cause people to change their financial plans and directions.

I would urge you not to accept the first opinion and pricing model you receive on something like this. I’ve heard prices of $35,000, but that includes as many attempts as it takes until your wife becomes pregnant. I’ve also heard of single attempts priced at $7,500 each. There are all kinds of options and guarantees, because they understand someone who is willing to do this really wants a baby.

If I’m in your shoes, I’m not accepting the idea that there’s one approach and one pricing structure to all this. I would explore other options, as far as doctors and clinics are concerned. Then, with your income, you could consider taking off a couple months from paying down debt and put some money toward the in vitro fertilization. If it doesn’t work, pay off a little more debt, pause the debt payoff, and try for a baby again.

Take some time, learn a little more, and go from there – always using cash for the endeavor. God bless you two!

– Dave

Follow Dave on Twitter (@DaveRamsey), or go to daveramsey.com. 

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