Digital Access

Digital Access
Access saukvalley.com from all your digital devices and receive breaking news and updates from around the area.

Home Delivery

Home Delivery
Local news, prep sports, Chicago sports, local and regional entertainment, business, home and lifestyle, food, classified and more! News you use every day! Daily, Daily including the e-Edition or e-Edition only.

Text Alerts

Text Alerts
Choose your news! Select the text alerts you want to receive: breaking news, prep sports scores, school closings, weather, and more. Text alerts are a free service from SaukValley.com, but text rates may apply.

Email Newsletters

Email Newsletters
We'll deliver news & updates to your inbox. Sign up for free e-newsletters today.
Letters to the Editor

Inflammatory language does not help at all

It seems that we are getting caught up in an ever-increasing need to “ramp up” the level of our language.

It is not new to hear candidates for elected office promise to “fight” for us or for a particular cause. Evidently it isn’t good enough to “fully support” or “work very hard” for an issue or to “do the best I can” to see something gets done. We have to fight. Of course, that implies all the other elected officials will try to deny your wishes.

On May 4, SVM published two editorials. One dealt with the loss of manufacturing jobs in Illinois, the minimal actions to try to not only recover them but to add more such jobs and the value of this segment of the economy.

While there is no question the actions recommended would be good for our state, the editorial questioned, “Where’s the outrage about the state’s stagnant manufacturing?”

Why do we have to be “outraged” in order to take action? Are we so lazy that recognizing a problem and taking actions to improve the situation are doomed unless we are “outraged”?

The “Editorials Elsewhere” discussed the issue of “angry driving.” Undeniably this is a serious problem. My concern is that the article stated, “It is time for a war on road rage.”

Seriously? A “war” on rage? We have used the title “war” for many years for our efforts to put an end to problems, but it seems that, increasingly, we jump to language to express our passion that is highly combative and even implies that there are people who want these problems to continue.

How many people do you know who want road rage and the lack of good jobs in Illinois to continue? Can’t we discuss things calmly?

Loading more