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CatMatt: Bow technology has greatly improved

Published: Friday, July 18, 2014 11:59 p.m. CDT
Caption
(Photo submitted by Matt Jones)
CatMatt's daughter, Taya, stands next to a camp fire in Prophetstown. The two were preparing for squirrel season and camping.

Hope you're enjoying Saturday so far. I know I am.

I'm on the river, fishing our annual co-ed event with my favorite fishing partner, Taya, my daughter. I hope we're catching some good ones while we are at it.

I'm hoping a bunch of you showed up to fish the event, but just in case you didn't, we are weighing fish at 1 p.m., so come on down and check it out. We are at Glenn Miller Marina just outside of Erie.

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You know, I find myself more excited than normal for this year's deer season. I've been thinking about a new bow, even though I just got one a couple years back, and it's just fine.

Nowadays, the options for stick and strings are endless. Companies like Matthews and PSE seem to be everywhere you look, but Hoyt and Bear and many others are out there as well.

Bows, especially compound bows, have evolved a great deal over the years. Some of the first compound bows I shot were very rough to draw, very heavy and very slow. New compounds are freakin' crazy.

They're short – like super short and fast, man are they fast. These bad boys are slingin' arrows 330 feet easy.

Some are much faster than that. The biggest thing in my opinion is the let off and the weight of the bows. In the old days, a bow would only let off about 20 or 30 percent. Let off means once you turned the wheels or cams over, the bow became easier to pull and hold.

This was so you were not holding the maximum weight back for a long time before your release. Now, bows are letting off some 70 and 80 percent, and they weigh around 3 pounds, thanks to all the new space-aged materials that bows can be made of.

The combination of the lighter weights, high let off and increased speed have made the bow market a $100 million per-year market. Technology comes with a price, though.

Back in the day, a good compound could be had for $100, and the top of the line bows were $200, maybe $300. You can't touch a high end bow for that now. You can still buy a quality compound for $200-300, but if you want a super bow, you'tre looking at $500-800 easy.

Like I said, they're great, but they're pricey. So if you're thinking about buying a new bow this year, you may want to start thinking about asking the boss for some O.T. to help finance it.

Well, don't look now, but the Rock is almost back to normal, and the Mississippi is falling fast, too. This means it's time to go fishing, or time to maybe work on a duck blind or go swimming or something.

What'd that old Nike catch phrase used to say? "Just do It." Well, there you go. Until next week all, Go catfish!

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