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Look to trusted sources for energy facts

Published: Thursday, July 17, 2014 1:15 a.m. CDT

As a project manager at Clean Line Energy and someone who is passionate about moving the wind industry forward, I would like to address some of the misleading statements made in the recent letter, “Health risks associated with energy lines” [The Reader’s Voice, July 8].

This letter specifically references another article published on June 6 that reported an osteopathic physician in Missouri, whose land may be crossed by a proposed direct current (DC) transmission line, who “undertook a search for unbiased independent studies” and argues that the results provide “evidence of detrimental effects direct current lines do have on humans.”

As support for this claim, the physician cites “The Bioinitiative report,” an Internet posting that was not peer-reviewed.

Despite the statement in the article that “Not all [studies in the Bioinitiative report] were related to the effects of high voltage direct current (HVDC) lines,” the fact is that none of the studies in the Bioinitiative report pertain to HVDC lines and effects of DC fields are not discussed at all.

Because of the differences between alternating current (AC) extremely low frequency fields and DC fields, none of the quotations from the Bioinitiative report in the June 6 article regarding AC are relevant to exposures to DC fields.

Despite extensive research, neither the International Agency for Research on Cancer, one of the world’s leading authorities on cancer, nor the World Health Organization have found that there is an adequate basis to conclude that DC fields at levels produced by HVDC lines contribute to cancer or other health effects. See www.who.int/peh-emf/publications/facts/fs299/en/.

I strongly urge folks to gain a full understanding of direct-current technology from nationally and internationally trusted sources. At Clean Line Energy, safety is among our chief concerns as we strive to treat landowners with the utmost respect.

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