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Local

Charges dropped against former Dixon attorney

Disbarred in 2012 after admitting to financially exploiting a client

Al Henry Williams
Al Henry Williams

DIXON – Two felony charges have been dropped against a former Dixon attorney who in 2012 pleaded guilty to stealing money from a former client.

A grand jury in November had indicted Al Henry Williams, 66, on two felony counts of theft.

He was accused of not paying the funeral bills for Arthur Elmer Black, a retired blacksmith, after the administrator for Black’s estate gave him $6,591 to do so. The charges were dropped Tuesday.

Lee County State’s Attorney Anna Sacco-Miller was unavailable for comment.

Williams previously pleaded guilty to financially exploiting a former client, Dorothy Gaul, and was sentenced to 6 months of conditional discharge and ordered to pay $15,992 in restitution to her estate.

Gaul, then 97 and living in a nursing home, hired Williams in August 2008 to handle her financial assets, which included her home in Dixon and more than $113,000 in checking and savings accounts.

Williams then opened a joint checking account with Gaul, which he used to pay her expenses.

Between December 2008 and August 2009, he wrote 25 checks to himself, totaling $95,000. He deposited 19 of them, totaling $92,800, into three bank accounts, then used the money for his own business and personal expenses.

After pleading guilty, Williams agreed to let the Illinois Attorney Registration and Disciplinary Commission disbar him. He can no longer practice law in Illinois.

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