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A fish tale gone bad

Published: Saturday, March 8, 2014 12:23 a.m. CDT
Caption
Submitted photo John Grubenhoff of Pasco, Wash., caught this 20.32-pound walleye, a new Washington state record, on Feb. 28 in the Columbia River. Grubenhoff has come under fire for not releasing the fish after weighing it.

Pasco, Washington – ever heard of it?

Well, I hadn't either until very recently. Seems this small Washington town along the Columbia River is home to the owner of the new state-record walleye.

I know, it's a walleye, but I appreciate a big fish when I see one, and this is a tremendous, flat-freakin' awesome pig of an eye. At 20.32 pounds and more than 35 inches long, this walleye is not only impressive, but it becomes the fifth-largest state record walleye.

I have seen some nice marble eyes here on the Rock River, but nothing like this brute. Congratulations to John Grubenhoff, who landed the fish earlier this week.

Now, the catch in the whole record story. Seems old John is taking a heaping helping of bunk from people for not releasing the big pregnant female. I know how sensitive of a subject this can be with people.

Of course, when it all comes down to it, if your state regulations for size and creel are followed, there's not much you can do but try to persuade. I feel bad for this dude – I mean, he should be celebrating.

Of course I would have measured the fish, had it certified and released it. Then I'd have had a replica made, but this guy, he decided to keep it. Here is a link to the story – check it out and see what you think.

[ http://billingsgazette.com/lifestyles/recreation/record-walleye-s-harvest-defended/article_0d17b295-2cdb-5b0f-83c8-45417cd9a55c.html ]http://billingsgazette.com/lifestyles/recreation/record-walleye-s-harvest-defended/article_0d17b295-2cdb-5b0f-83c8-45417cd9a55c.html

Catch and release has been a heated topic among fisherman of all types for years. Bass fisherman were always whining, and really still do. Many think all bass should be released.

I appreciate a group standing up for the quarry they chase, but again, there is a lot to take into consideration. But anyway, that's a whole lot of writing I just don't have room for.

We will just leave it at this: Every fish and every body of water has its own determining factors when it comes to what and how many should be kept. What applies to the Rock probably would not apply to the Ohio, and so on and on.

So now that you have seen this big old walleye and hopefully taken a gander at the extended forecast, are you ready? Until next time, Go Catfish!

 

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