Judges, state’s attorney key to curbing drug sales

Chief: Their cooperation helps police

Published: Tuesday, Feb. 25, 2014 1:15 a.m. CDT • Updated: Tuesday, Feb. 25, 2014 8:42 a.m. CDT
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Dixon Police Chief Danny D. Langloss Jr.

Aggressively pursuing drug dealers continues to be the top priority of the Dixon Police Department. Over the past 10 years, we have been very successful in reducing drug sales in our area.

That doesn’t mean the problem doesn’t remain, but it is far less significant.

There are several key components to this success, and they do not all center on the police. The role of the state’s attorney and judges is crucial. Police conduct the investigations, but several key tools can be approved only by the state’s attorney or a judge.

The two main tools are eavesdrops and search warrants. An eavesdrop allows the police to [secretly] record conversations related to criminal activity. Search warrants allow us to search houses, cars and people.

In the past, manyof those dealers would stay and operate out of one primary location. They kept the drugs close to them.

Over time, this has changed considerably. These dealers are much more mobile and always on the move. When we receive credible information, we must move on it right away, or our chance will be gone.

Because of this, many times we need to meet with the state’s attorney and a judge on very short notice. This happens at all hours of the day and night. The information about the case is presented to them, and the proper tools are given to us.

That allows us to act quickly and decisively and has led to building hundreds of great cases over the years, resulting in sending cocaine, heroin, methamphetamine, and cannabis dealers to prison for extended periods of time.

While I have personally thanked our judges and state’s attorneys in the past, I feel it is important for the community to know that they are going the extra mile in the pursuit of justice. Regardless of whether it is 3 p.m. or 3 a.m., they are always available.

From teaching law enforcement officers across the state for the past several years, I have learned that this is not the norm. We are very fortunate to have the dedicated men and women serving on the bench and in our state’s attorney’s office.  

Note to readers: Danny D. Langloss Jr. is chief of the Dixon Police Department.

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