Gadgets to help weather the weather

Does anybody out there have a number to a weatherman who can actually tell us what the weather might do 24 hours in advance, and just be close?

I ain’t asking for perfection or anything, just be kinda, sorta close. I mean, it’s bad enough our weather is so crazy, but could the people who predict it at least halfway prepare me for what tomorrow may bring?

This is crazy, man. I don’t even watch weather on television anymore, ’cause they just plain old ain’t worth a dang at what they do. Seems like most days, they miss the wind speed by 10 miles an hour, and partly sunny and partly cloudy, heck – they might as well ban them from even using those terms, period.

Nope, I didn’t set out
this week to bash every weatherman or woman on the planet, but I did point it out to kinda segue into a little bit of information on a couple things I do to kinda help myself combat their lack of accuracy.

The first and simplest of the three gadgets I invested in was a thermometer. Yep, I like to know the temperature, and I got tired of someone telling me it would be 50 degrees at 6 a.m., then hitting the water only to find out it was 30-somethin’ and
I was colder than all get out. A simple little 
thermometer on the dash of the boat really helps me determine what I need in the boat once I get in it.

Gadget number two is a barometer. Most outdoorsmen know what a rising barometer and a falling barometer can mean to a day out-of-doors when it comes to furry or finned critters.

I have been carrying one for a few years now, and it is really neat to watch how a fish’s aggression changes when a barometer rises or falls ... and even how their mood changes during long spells of a steady barometer.

Last but not least on the list is a compass ... yes, I said compass. It’s not necessarily so that I know what way I’m headed, ‘cause I can usually figure that out. The compass allows you to peg the exact wind direction, and helps me lay out my plan of attack for the day.

Wind is a huge factor for me anchoring on cover, so I can plan my whole day in areas where I can stay out of the wind ... as much as possible, anyway.

I know these are fairly obvious tools of the trade, but I find that generally it is the most basic tools that we overlook the most. If you’re a fisherman and you couple these tools with a basic depth finder, what have you got?

Let’s review: You’ll know the air and water temperature. You’ll know the wind direction, the barometric pressure, the depth, the cover. In other words, you’re a pretty well-informed fisherman. Up your odds? I think so.

Pick up a couple of these little tools and see what they do for you. It’s really neat when you start to see the patterns come to life right in front of your face.

Until next week ...

Go Catfish!