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Neversnag Achors are a game-changer

Published: Friday, July 12, 2013 9:59 p.m. CST
Caption
(Matt Jones/Shaw Media)
Neversnag Anchors, like the one above, get Cat Matt's seal of approval.

Hello to all you out there in the Rock River valley. Finally, some of the humidity has dried up and some cool, dry air has filtered in. Kinda nice for a change, after some absolutely terrible, wet air. The slight north breeze feels really, really good, too.

On occasion in my ramblings, I take a week to touch on a new product or products that are really, really good for what we do in the outdoors. This week, I wanted to bring a great product to your attention that I recently was introduced to. This new "thing" has made my time on the water a ton easier. And easier is almost always better, if your results stay positive.

Mike Paul from Columbus, Ohio, recently contacted me about his new product, saying his Neversnag Anchor would "change the way I fished." Of course, when approached by potential sponsors, I am always open to new ideas, and I jumped at the chance.

Now, the anchor I have used for the last 5 years or so was a great five-pronged design, very stout, with a slip bar and chain. The only drawback was the weight, at more than 22 pounds. Not that 22 pounds is super heavy or anything, but after a long, hot day and pulling anchor 20 or 30 times, it starts to wear you down a bit.

The first thing I noticed about the Neversnag was the weight. This anchor weighs in at just more than 10 pounds – chain and all. Right away, I am excited. Big question is, would it hold a big boat in big current? Mike assured me that they had been holding their big, heavy boats with them on the Ohio River without a problem.

Of course, never having used the anchor and not knowing Mike, I wasn't convinced. I agreed to try them out, and days later, they arrived.

First things first: when I pulled them from the box, they looked great. All six prongs were intact and stout, and the shackle for the chain is a brute.

The chain runs up the body of the anchor to the top, where a zip tie affixes it to a welded loop in the frame. What that does is allow for removal of the anchor when it becomes severely snagged. When heavy force is applied, the zip tie breaks, and the chain pulls on the shackle, basically turning the anchor upside down and making it easily removable from any snaggy situation. Thus, the Neversnag name. 

I am certainly not going to bore you with each and every toss of the anchor the last few weeks, but let's just say these are some really awesome anchors. On top of that, I am tugging half the weight I used to every time I wanted to relocate. I am all for that, man.

Most importantly, these things just flat grab. Once this thing hits the bottom, you will feel a little slip, and then it starts to dig and when it grabs, it grabs. Feels like you could just rip the bottom of the river open with it. On occasion, you pop a zip tie like I said before, which requires you to replace it, which takes all of a couple of seconds.

All in all, this is one of the top three or four new products I have ever used.

If you're interested, check out neversnaganchors.com or "like" Neversnag Anchors on Facebook. The anchors come in at 50-some bucks, plus shipping, which really is a good price for an anchor that holds you where you want to hold.

So, there you have it: a simple product that can change your fishing in a big way.

Go Catfish!

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