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From our archives: ‘Swat, therefore, the voracious fly’

What we thought: 100 years ago

Published: Monday, May 6, 2013 1:15 a.m. CST • Updated: Tuesday, May 7, 2013 4:02 p.m. CST
Caption
(Medford Sun)
Anti-fly campaigns were common in the early 1900s. A poster printed in the Medford (Ore.) Sun in 1915 made the point bluntly. A Telegraph editorial from May 5, 1913, urged readers to kill flies in the spring so as to head off a greater scourge in the summer and fall.

Note to readers – Sauk Valley Media reprints editorials from the past as a regular Monday feature. The following editorials appeared in the Telegraph on May 5, 1913.

Why the fly is dangerous

For each female fly hatched in April, there will be, if none of her progeny are killed, 7,600,000,000 in September of the same year.

Every fly is a possible carrier of disease on his hairy little feet.

He delights in cesspools, decaying animal and vegetable matter, barnyards, offal heaps, garbage barrels, etc., places where disease germs abide and multiply.

But he likes to vary his  diet – fresh meat, sugar, bread, anything that humans eat, the fly also likes.

He dearly loves to frequent the kitchen and dining room of his human friends at their meal time, and he lunches on all kinds of filth between those meals.

Every time he leaves the swill barrel or the cesspool for the kitchen or dining room, he carries with him on his feet some of the filth he has been walking in.

Swat, therefore, the voracious fly, or better still, swat all you see, but keep from seeing many by starving them to death by keeping all their food supply in the stable, cesspool, swill barrel, kitchen and dining room, safely and securely covered up.

Fly fighting maxims

Be up to date. Swat the fly. Clean up and boost.

Eternal vigilance should be your watchword.

The fly is a home wrecker. Destroy it.

When the fly comes in the door, good health goes out the window.

It’s not work that kills men, but worry. Swat the fly.

May provide for auto fire truck

The members of the [Dixon] city council are at work preparing the annual appropriation ordinance, which it is hoped can be gotten ready for presentation a week from today. The commissioners are discussing the advisability of including in the ordinance an appropriation toward purchasing an auto fire truck, an appliance which, it is reported, a majority of the council favor.

The old hose wagon has about outlived its usefulness, say the firemen, and it is unsafe for use at the present time.

It is argued that it would require over $300 to repair the wagon so it will be fit for use, and inasmuch as the horses are expensive property, the commissioners may see fit to appropriate for a truck.

Good Sunday service

The hourly Sunday interurban service, which was inaugurated by the S. D. & E. yesterday, proved especially popular with the patrons of the road. The cars made the trip between the two cities [Dixon and Sterling] in 40 minutes, as during the week, but cars leave each city hourly during the afternoon and evening.

90-year-old farmer

C.C. Fuller of Erie, Whiteside county, although over ninety years of age, has twenty acres of land which he is tending himself. A friend who recently called on Mr. Fuller found him plowing with a three-horse plow, and he was doing the work with the ease of a man of sixty.

 

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