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Nicklaus still believes Woods will best record

Tracking Tiger

Published: Monday, March 4, 2013 10:05 p.m. CDT

(Continued from Page 1)

PALM BEACH GARDENS, Fla. – Tiger Woods was long gone from PGA National when Jack Nicklaus settled into his seat in the NBC Sports tower.

Woods' week at the Honda Classic included two lost balls, four shots in the water and 15 shots out of the bunkers. He made four double bogeys, was never better than 3-under par at any point and was under par for only 26 out of the 72 holes he played.

None of this was enough to alarm Nicklaus.

In what now sounds like a broken record, Nicklaus maintains that records are made to be broken, including his gold standard of 18 professional majors.

"I still think he'll break my record," Nicklaus said Sunday. "Tiger's talent, at 37 ... it's not that old. I won four after that. They were spread out. It wasn't that difficult. I don't think for Tiger to get four or five more – or six or seven – is that big a stretch."

Woods, of course, has been stuck on 14 since winning the U.S. Open in a playoff at Torrey Pines in 2008. Perhaps of more interest than his 0-for-14 streak since then is that he has not seriously contended in any of the majors since giving up a two-shot lead to Y.E. Yang at the 2009 PGA Championship.

Sure, he was tied for the lead at the turn at the Masters 2 years ago. He was in the penultimate group at Pebble Beach in the 2010 U.S. Open, as he was at Royal Lytham & St. Annes last summer.

But when was the last time Woods had a realistic chance in the final hour of a major?

Even during his previous two droughts in the majors (both 0-for-10), he had serious chances to win at Royal Birkdale in 1998 and Pinehurst in 1999, and then at Hazeltine in 2002 and Royal St. George's in 2003.

The Masters starts in 38 days, and Woods will be among the top two favorites to win a fifth green jacket, as he should be.

It's foolish to suggest 37 is old, even on a left knee that has gone through as many surgeries as Woods has won green jackets. Nonetheless, with age time seems to go faster.

"I still think he can do it," Nicklaus said. "But that said, he has still got to do it. He hasn't won one in 5 years. He had better get with it if he's going to."

Even after the road to 18 majors went over a cliff at the end of 2009 – and it took Woods 2 years to recover from the public embarrassment of his infidelities, his injuries and yet another coaching change – Nicklaus stayed consistent in the belief that his own record will fall.

Nicklaus never went through a major championship drought this severe, except for the 20 majors he played between the 1980 PGA Championship at Oak Hill and his 18th and final major at the 1986 Masters when he was 46.

It's too early to make a conclusion about Woods' 2013 season.

His game is good enough to win anywhere on any golf course. It's good enough to win majors. It's good enough to return No. 1, perhaps even before the Masters. The intimidation and aura of Woods might not be what it was, but there were traces of it the way he rallied at the Memorial last year and dominated at Torrey Pines this year.

Most Major championships

MastersU.S. BritishPGATotal

1. Jack Nicklaus643518

2. Tiger Woods433414

3. Walter Hagen024511

4. Gary Player31329

4. Ben Hogan24129

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