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Grinnell’s Taylor breaks NCAA record with 138 points

Toast of college basketball

Published: Thursday, Nov. 22, 2012 11:08 p.m. CST
Caption
(AP)
Grinnell guard Jack Taylor (3) shot 108 times during Tuesday's game against Faith Baptist Bible in Grinnell, Iowa. Taylor scored 138 points to shatter the NCAA scoring record.

How did Grinnell's Jack Taylor wind up with 138 points in a game?

Well, he did miss 56 shots, more than he made. And he didn't play for 4 minutes.

Otherwise he would have scored even more.

As it was, Taylor shattered the NCAA scoring record by 25 points Tuesday night in the Pioneers' 179-104 victory over Faith Baptist Bible in Grinnell, Iowa.

Taylor hoisted a mind-boggling 108 shots, one every 20 seconds. Layups, fadeaways and 3-pointers (27 of those) were all working in a display that had the NBA's basketball royalty buzzing a day later, from Kobe Bryant and Kevin Durant to Carmelo Anthony and LeBron James.

"It's like a video game," Anthony said. "How can you shoot 108 times?"

"It's unbelievable, honestly," James said. "There's two games that I would love to see: One was Wilt, when he had 100, and this kid, I want to see him, too. Sir Jack."

Wilt Chamberlin's record of 100 points scored in 1962 still stands as the NBA mark. Taylor was the third player in NCAA basketball with at least 100 points, but his performance was the most prolific.

Taylor himself was still trying to catch his breath Wednesday.

"Honestly, it's still not settling in. It was hard to sleep," Taylor told The Associated Press after appearing on "Good Morning America" and the "Today" show.

Understandably so. Taylor is just a 5-foot-10, 170-pound sophomore from Black River Falls, Wis. How did he score more points than anyone in college history?

Well, he had 58 at halftime. And then he scored 30 more in the first 9 minutes of the second half, draining seven straight 3s at one point.

The Division III record was the first to fall, as Taylor reached 91 points on a 25-footer from the left wing with 11:14 to go. He cracked 100 on a layup less than 3 minutes later, and with 4:42 to go he drained yet another 3 to pass the NCAA record of 113 set by Rio Grande's Bevo Francis against Hillsdale in 1954.

In 1953, Francis had 116 against Ashland Junior College but Frank Selvy is the only other player to reach triple figures, scoring 100 points for Division I Furman against Newberry in 1954. The previous Grinnell record was 89 by Griffin Lentsch last Nov. 19 against Principia.

Taylor made 27 of his 71 3-point attempts and was 52 of 108 overall. He had a hot hand, sure, but he plays in a system designed to reward high-volume shooting.

When coach Dave Arseneault landed at Grinnell 24 years ago, he inherited a program that went from 1965 until 1994 without a winning season. Because of their high academic standards and rural location 50 miles east of Des Moines, winning basketball had simply eluded the Pioneers for decades.

Arsenault wanted to make up for Grinnell's lack of athleticism and size, and make the game more fun. The Pioneers have won four conference championships with the pour-it-on style but have yet to win an NCAA tournament game, raising questions about whether the emphasis on scoring at the expense of defense and patience doesn't reflect traditional basketball strategy and sportsmanship.

"Maybe they're right," said David N. Arseneault, the co-head coach and the Arseneault's son. "But the way I look at it is ... there's no chance we would have been able to have even close to the amount of success we've had without this system."

The Pioneers didn't set out to have Taylor break any records Tuesday night. But after discovering Taylor had 58 points at halftime, they decided to go for it.

"A lot of people are saying it wasn't the most team-oriented thing to do," Taylor said. "But I wouldn't have been able to do it without the encouragement and support from my teammates."

Taylor didn't leave the game until the closing moments with his team up 70. Arsenault said he thought about pulling Taylor earlier, but after watching him drain six straight 3s in a 2-minute span, he couldn't bear to pull the plug on something so special.

"My thought was 'Hey, man, the kid's got it going. I'm going to let him go,'" he said.

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