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Letters to the Editor

Opposes tax increase for sports complex

To inform the voting public, I did some research. 

1) Dixon and Sterling both have a 6.75 percent sales tax.

2) In 2011, Dixon raised $3.466 million in sales taxes; Sterling raised $3.978 million.

3) Eliminate the prison population from Dixon’s population, and Dixon has 12 percent less population than Sterling.

Per population, Dixon raises more funds than Sterling at the same tax rate, so why should Dixon be taxed heavier to pay for something we don’t need?

While yes, it’s only a 1 percentage point increase from 6.75 to 7.75, a 1 percent increase would be only 7 cents, whereas a 1 percentage point increase is actually a 14.9 percent increase, which doesn’t sound nearly as appealing as 1 percent.

Why are we focusing on a sports complex when our schools are dilapidated, textbooks are out-of-date, and classrooms are overcrowded because of underfunding?

Before you vote yes, consider the reasoning being presented, which is everyone else has one – “keeping up with the Joneses.” Keep in mind, Oregon’s bills are paid for by Exelon (Byron nuke plant); Sterling’s are fronted by Wahl Clipper; and Geneseo has always valued sports over education.

Be informed. Just because all will be conveniently located together for ease on parents, it doesn’t make it a good decision. What will they do with this 14.9 percent increase when the building we agree to pay for is done? Then they get to do whatever they want with it, and they’re not going to lower it back down.

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